June 12 : Why Ooni Betrayed MKO Abiola – Oba Sikiru Adetona

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The Ooni of Ife, Oba Okunade Sijuade’s role in the
aftermath of the annulment of the 1993 presidential
election is widely thought to have
been less than noble. In Awujale, the recently released
autobiography of Oba Sikiru Adetona, the Awujale of
Ijebuland, Sijuade’s connivance
with those who annulled the election is brought into
sharp focus His position as the most revered traditional
ruler in Yorubaland has not innoculated Oba Okunade
Sijuade Olubuse 11, the Ooni of Ife,
from public scorn. Since 1993, much of the mystique
around him has been eroded, largely through the
carnage sparked by the controversial
annulment of the 1993 presidential election , aka June
12.
Oba Sijuade came out of the annulment saga with grave
reputation injuries from which he is yet to, and may not,
recover, given the decision of Oba Sikiru Kayode
Adetona, the Awujale of Ijebuland, to re-invite public
attention to Sijuwade’s role in one of the most
grotesque episodes in Yoruba and Nigerian history.
The medium chosen by Oba Adetona is Awujale, his
recently released autobiography, in which the 11th
chapter is dedicated to the annulment and the struggle
for the de-annulment of the election won by the late
Chief M.K.O Abiola.
In Awujale, Adetona presents what can hardly be
described as a worm’s eye view. And in the book, the
Ooni does not come out smelling like roses. As one of
the most prominent Yoruba traditional
rulers, Adetona was regularly invited to meetings with
General Ibrahim Babangida, the military president that
annulled the election and installed an Interim National
Government, ING, headed by Chief Ernest Shonekan.
As the widespread anger provoked by the annulment
and Babangida’s ING contraption raged, the former
military president hoped to limit the damage to his
reputation and that of his
government, appealing to leaders from all the country’s
geo-political zones, especially the South-West, which felt
wounded because of
Abiola.
For one of those meetings in Abuja, writes Adetona in
Awujale, he arrived on a Thursday. The meeting was to
hold the next day. While
in his hotel room on the day of arrival, Adetona called
the Alaafin of Oyo, Oba Lamidi Adeyemi, to say that
there was a need for a meeting
of Yoruba traditional rulers, where they could arrive at a
common position to be presented at the next day’s
meeting with Babangida.
Adeyemi agreed. Adetona then suggested that there was
also a need to inform the Ooni and asked Adeyemi to
accompany him to Sijuwade’s room.
Adeyemi, however, was not keen because of the rivalry,
over superiority, between him and the Ooni. Eventually,
he gave in. The late Oba Adeyinka Oyekan, Oba of
Lagos, was also informed. He
agreed that a meeting was required, but refused to
accompany them to the Ooni’s suite. However, he said
he would support whatever
position the meeting adopted.
In the Ooni’s suite, Adetona and Adeyemi met the Ife
monarch dining with Alhaji Ado Bayero, Emir of Kano.
Another Yoruba monarch, Oba Frederick Aroloye, the
Owa of Idanre, writes Adetona, sat in a corner.
When the two dining monarchs finished their meals, they
went into the Ooni’s room for a discussion, after which
the Ooni came out to
meet Adetona and Adeyemi.
“When we told the Ooni the purpose of our meeting, he
said he had met the Northern Emirs. Their position was
the same as ours. We asked how and he said that they
wanted a fresh meeting to be called of the Council of
State along with us. The Council of State, as enshrined
in the constitution, has powers to advise the President,”
Adetona writes.
But what the Northern traditional rulers wanted was not
exactly what the Yoruba monarchs wanted.
“Our mandate from the Yorubas was that the election
had been concluded and our son was clearly the winner.
So, all we wanted was
that they should just simply release the results,” the
author explains.
Adetona then insisted that if a Council of State meeting
was to be called, it should be for the purpose of
ensuring that the election was
de-annulled and the wish of the people respected. The
Ooni agreed.
But the Alaafin, writes Adetona, said there was no need
for another meeting because the key members of the
Council had already expressed their opposition to the
annulment.
When Adetona and the Alaafin left the Ooni, they went
to discuss seating arrangements for the next day’s
meeting with the other Yoruba traditional rulers.
Apparently suspicious that the Ooni could
switch positions, the monarchs agreed that they would
sit in a way that would ensure that the Ife monarch was
hemmed between two of them “so as to forestall any
wavering of position.”
The planned sitting arrangement was foiled. As the
traditional rulers walked into the venue of the meeting,
they found seats that bore each
attendee’s name. Babangida came in, explained the
position of the government and sought reactions from
his audience. The first came
from Ibrahim Dasuki, then Sultan of Sokoto, who said
very little apart from accusing the government of using
traditional rulers to quell
crises brought upon the nation by the government itself.
He suggested that Babangida should invite members of
the Council of State to join the traditional rulers in the
discussion of the
annulment. The Ooni was the next to speak and
presented the position of the Yoruba obas: declaration
of Abiola as the winner.
It was something the meeting had not expected. “You
could have heard a pin drop,” writes Adetona. Next was
Bayero, who expressed no opposition to what the Ooni
said, but called for a fresh Council of state meeting .
After him spoke the Oba of Benin, who condemned the
annulment and rejected calls for a Council of State
meeting .
The natural rulers continued turning the heat on
Babangida. According to Adetona, Gbong Gwon Jos, the
late Chief Fom Bot, told the meeting that he could not
return to his domain if Babangida did
not to de-annul the election, as his subjects had
demanded, and asked the former president to find
accommodation for him in Abuja.
A traditional ruler from the South-East, Adetona writes,
was more dramatic, telling Babangida to quit as
president. “Please go. Please go,” he shouted.
Then Babangida cut in, explaining that the decision to
annul or de-annul was not solely his, but that of the
military heirachy. He kept on
calling on others to speak, but the obas observed that
he was calling only people who sat to his right. The
obas sat to his left. This drew
a protest from the Alaafin, who Babangida was forced
to ask to speak.
The Oyo monarch insisted that another Council of State
meeting was needless because the late Dr. Nnamdi
Azikiwe, a member, was out of
the country, while some other key members had
expressed their disapproval of the annulment in the
media. Other traditional rulers told Babangida that he
should save the country from a huge crisis by
respecting the wishes of Nigerians.
Then, Babangida attempted one more throw of the dice.
In a somewhat emotional tone, he told the meeting how
close he and Abiola were. His government, he added,
had paid Abiola hefty debts owed him by previous
regimes. The sum, Babangida said, was about
$600million. The scent of money scrambled a particular
royal head–
the Ooni’s.
“When he heard this piece of information, the Ooni
became angry and said something to the effect that if
Babangida paid him (Ooni) that much, he would be
living on the Island of Capri in Italy,” Adetona writes.
Sijuade then got up to go to the toilet. Adetona
followed, spewing criticisms at his fellow oba for going
against what the Yoruba traditional rulers had agreed
on. After the meeting, watched by Uche Chukwumerije,
Information Secretary in the Interim National
Government, the Ooni told journalists that he was in
support of Babangida’s position that a fresh election
should be held and that the obas should return to their
domains and tell their people to prepare for the election.
Adetona thought he had not heard Ooni right. “To
assure myself that what I heard was true, I invited one
of the reporters, who was there when the Ooni was
speaking to my room. This was a reporter from The
Nigerian Tribune. Fortunately, the Alaafin was with me
when the reporter played the tape for us. We were
stunned,” the Awujale writes.
From his hotel room, the Ooni called Adetona on the
intercom and announced gleefully that he had told the
world (through the media) of the Yoruba position.
Adetona replied that he was not sure that
Sijuwade’s claim was correct. Adetona, accompanied by
the Alaafin and the reporter, went over to Sijuade’s
room. The Ooni repeated his
claim that he presented the Yoruba position to the
press.
He was instantly put to shame, when the reporter was
asked to play his tape, which contained the opposite of
Ooni’s claim. Adetona and the Alaafin then pressured
Ooni into granting another interview, restating the
position of the Yoruba. He did and the reporter was
asked to take the interview to media houses for
publication the next
day. The interview was published by newspapers the
next day, but Chukwumerije had caused the first
interview to be used on the network news of the
Nigerian Television Authority, NTA.
In the book, the Awujale was unsparing in his attack on
former Nigerian leader, Olusegun Obasanjo. He
described him as a Judas, “who would betray his
people,” who lacks credibility and squandered “the
enormous goodwill,” which he carried into office “with a
performance that left him with a second term short of
tangible achievements.”
Oba Adetona recalled an event on 24 July 2002, the late
Abraham Adesanya’s 80th birthday in Ijebu-Igbo, Ogun
State, when in a ride with Obasanjo to a makeshift
helipad he told Obasanjo how disappointed he had
become over Obasanjo’s pussy-footing on the issue of
federalism. “This was the dividing line for me in our
relationship,” Awujale recalled and Adesanya’s birthday
presented an opportunity for him to tell
Obasanjo how he felt about him, when they rode
together in a Mercedes Benz limousine, with former
Ogun governor, Olusegun Osoba, as witness.
“It was going to be a short trip but I had
something to say and so it had to be said quickly
enough while the three of us shared some privacy. I
said there was a time when I had trusted Obasanjo so
much so that I could swear by his name, but that the
trust was now gone. Obasanjo asked why. I answered
that Obasanjo was no longer credible.” The Oba recalled
further in the
book, that at another time when he visited Obasanjo in
Aso Rock, Obasanjo revisited their earlier conversation
during which he told the
Awujale, accusatorily, that he painted him a Judas.
Awujale reconfirmed the labeling according to his
account.
“I told him that I not only remembered but still
maintained that he was a Judas who would betray his
people…I had no qualms about speaking plainly to him.
In high office, people who surround leaders tend to skirt
around the truth,” Awujale wrote.
The Awujale was clearly not impressed by Obasanjo’s
tenure as nigeria’s leader. ‘‘Eight years in office was
ample time to put electricity on a very strong footing.
Eight years was enough to put
down a strong foot against corruption and make a clear
difference. Eight years was adequate for orderliness and
the rule of law to triumph in every facet of our society.
These were the basis upon
which I gave my support for the office,” he submitted.

Abubakar Shekau Still Leads Boko Haram – Journalist Calls Out Chad President

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Last week, Chadian president ,Idriss Deby revealed Boko
Haram leader Abubakar Shekau had been ousted and
replaced with a new leader.He said
There is someone apparently called Mahamat Daoud
who is said to have replaced Abubakar Shekau and
wants to negotiate with the Nigerian government .”

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Nigerian journalist,Ahmad Salkida,reportedly on exile in
Dubai is known to have contact with Boko Haram
leaders,as they allow him speak with them.He has
accused the Chadian leader of lying, and says the
Chadian president had also deceived former president,
Goodluck Jonathan into entering a fruitless peace deal
with Boko Haram.

The Weekend Joins ‘Empire’ Cast For September Issue of Vogue

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Singer, The Weeknd steps out in style in the September
issue of Vogue. The Canadian crooner, who currently
has the No. 1 single in the country, joins the cast of
Fox’s hit show ‘ Empire ’ in a high-fashion spread,
photographed by Mario Testino .
Abel gets suited up and poses alongside the chic Lyon
clan including Cookie (Taraji P. Henson), Lucious
(Terrence Howard), and their sons, Andre (Trai Byers),
Jamal (Jussie Smollett), and Hakeem (Bryshere Y.
Gray). They are also joined by ‘Empire’ creator Lee
Daniels and supermodels Naomi Campbell and Jourdan
Dunn .

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Buhari Doesnt Owe Igbos Anything – Dr. Junaid Mohammed

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The Convener of the Coalition of Northern Politicians,
Academics, Professionals and Businessmen, Dr. Junaid
Mohammed, has dismissed the sentiments shared by
the former Governor of Anambra State, Gov Ezeife that
the Igbos have not been treated fairly in the governance
of Nigeria.
Ezeife argued that President Muhammadu Buhari’s
appointment of Dr. Ibe Kachikwu, who hails from the
Igbo-speaking part of Delta State, to head the Nigerian
National Petroleum Corporation, was not enough to
satisfy the South-East.
However, on Friday, Mohammed criticised Ezeife,
insisting that people of the Igbo nation have enjoyed
favourable treatment.
He added it was wrong to reward the Igbo simply on
the basis of the Nigerian Civil War, which lasted
between 1967 and 1970.
Mohammed said:
“If it is about Buhari making the appointments based on
merit, I have no problems with it. I don’t believe Buhari
or Nigeria owes any Igbo anything. I don’t care what
Ezeife says; if they had seceded, there would have been
no Nigeria today. As people who acted outside the
interest of Nigeria as a country, to expect compensation
is a very odd logic.
“If the Igbo don’t like it, they can attempt secession
again. If they do, they must be prepared to live with the
consequences. Nobody owes them anything and nobody
is out to compensate them for anything.”
The doctor-turned-politician also condemned claims that
Buhari’s appointment of northerners into key positions
in government was done out of ethnic sentiment.
He said:
“Critics should tell us which ethnic groups have been
favoured by Buhari in the course of making his
appointments in parastatals and agencies. Those who
are making those allegations, particularly the Igbo, have
not told us exactly which parastatals.
“For example, an Igbo man has just been appointed as
the head of the NNPC, one of the most important
government agencies in Nigeria. And over 50 per cent of
those appointed before him were also Igbos. So, if
people decide to be mischievous, there is nothing
anybody can do about it. As far as I am concerned,
those appointed have been good and credible persons.”
On reports that Buhari may head the petroleum ministry
for the next 18 months, the northern leader stated that
there was no living Nigerian at that public level who
knew as much about the ministry as Buhari.
According to Mohammed, there is full justification for
Buhari to be petroleum minister for as long as he
desires.
He stated”
“Moreover, the consequences of what happens in the oil
ministry are so dire. When one looks at the track record
of the past minister, one can see what we have to deal
with as a country as a result of her being made a
minister.
“In fact, I encourage him to retain the defence ministry
because we are in a state of war and he is a
distinguished retired general who has headed every
single division of the Nigerian Army during his service.
If he decides to be the defence minister, I would be
more than glad.”
Credit – Punch

Tips For Men: Lying Might Keep Your Relationship Alive

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Most people can agree that lying is an absolute no-no
when it comes to relationships. At worst, getting caught
in a lie will win you a one-way ticket out the door and a
permanent spot on the sh*t-talking list. At best, it
causes tension. No matter how you spin it, lying usually
ends badly. But according to new research, lying can
actually be an important factor in keeping your
relationship strong. Strange right?.
There are apparently some lies that can bring you closer
with your friends or partner.
The pro-social lies (white lies) and anti-social lies
(deception) on relationships has impacts. Pro-social lies
are ones told to protect another’s feelings or help
someone, while anti-social lies are told to cover up
wrongdoing or gain an advantage.
In other words, lying about how much you like his new
shirt is pro-social; lying about suspicious texts is anti-
social.
While in general, society views lying as bad, most
people would agree that fibbing is acceptable in certain
situations. A balance between honesty and fibbing is
crucial to maintaining a harmonious environment. Yep,
honesty is *not* always the best policy. Knowing when
to fib and when to come clean not only preserves—but
strengthens—connections.
So next time he asks if you love that ’90s metal band
poster, you can feel less guilty when you respond, “of
course, sweetie.”

Babatunde Fashola And Senator Bola Tinubu At War

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Two former Governors of Lagos state, Senator Bola
Ahmed Tinubu and Mr Babatunde Fashola are poised for
a confrontation as the crisis between the duo deepened
on Friday following reports that their loyalists have
drawn up battle plans, even as stakeholders in both the
All Progressives Congress (APC) and Lagos State are
said to have waded in, calling for a truce.
According to a former member of the Lagos State
Executive Council, “some elders are planning a peace
meeting between the duo.”
Information gathered also revealed that forces loyal to
Tinubu felt incensed by the statement issued by
Fashola on Thursday in which he insinuated that
corruption allegations were being pinned on him by
those opposed to his getting a federal appointment, a
veiled reference to Tinubu and the incumbent governor,
Akinwumi Ambode.
“The coming days will be interesting,” an aide to a
chieftain of the APC close to both leaders said.
While the Tinubu camp is said to have vowed to fight
on, “ to teach the former governor a lesson,” it was
learnt that the Fashola side “is determined to ensure
that his integrity is not tainted by those who are jealous
of his ascendancy in the polity.”
Both sides, however, on Friday refrained from taking
direct shots at each other.

Yvonne Nelson Found Love In Nigerian Actor Deyemi Okanlawon

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Ghanaian actress Yvonne Nelson seems to have found a
substitute for her quondam BF.
Yvonne shared a photo of both her and Deyemi
Okanlawon. The two posed on the same spot were
Yvonne, a few months ago, had posed for a funny
picture with her ex John Dumelo. John and Yvonne were
snapped while dressed in each other’s clothes.

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With caption ……..so my boyfriend @deyemitheactor in
#iftomorrownevercomes passed biiiiiiii to say Hiiiiiiiii
Deyemi starred in Yvonne’s latest production, ‘If
Tomorrow Never Comes’.
Yvonne, in a recent interview, had called Nigerian men
liars. What now!! a change of mind? hmmm!! maybe
love don set in sha!!

Comparison Between 2Face ‘African Queen’ And Wizkid’s ‘Ojuelegba’(see hilarious tweets)

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Following the Viral Video of Alicia Keys Dancing to
Wizkid song ‘ojuelegba‘, some guys on Twitter took it
up on themselves to start drawing comparisons
Between Wizkid’s Ojuelegba and Tu Face Idibia‘s
Vintage ‘African Queen‘ track.
TwitterNG users as usual didn’t take time to start
bashing them at the unruly comparisons.
See some of the hilarious reactions below.
It all started with a tweet from this guy.
Joke of the century”@Iam_Jaymez: – Recognition In
Africa or World – Wide, Ojuelegba kills African queen
Hands down… Kill yourself.”
— Richard Thomas (@TWEETARRAZZI) August 5, 2015
And people reacted below.
African Queen was done in 9ja here n gained popularity
from 9ja to d whole world, Wiz had to remix the song to
get popularity now..wtf!! — 2rumusique (@tomitru37)
August 5, 2015
Who ever started this African Queen – Ojuelegba
comparison must be smoking the same thing Vic O
smoked yesterday. I’m sure @wizkidayo agrees
— Schwein-Derlin (@NihzaTheGuru) August 5, 2015
Ojuelegba is a cool hit by Wizkid but African Queen by
Tuface is Legendary and Timeless.
— Kate ThaVincent (@ThaVincent) August 5, 2015
Tha feeling you get when African Queen comes on…
Arrrghhh….. Una no go die better for the comparison.
— 2rumusique (@tomitru37) August 5, 2015
African queen was legendary. The weed 2face smoked
before recording that song is in a museum in Greece. No
other person is allwd to smoke it
— Schwein-Derlin (@NihzaTheGuru) August 5, 2015
I’m angry! *deletes playlist* *downloads new songs*
Track 1: African queen Track 2: African queen Track 3:
African queen Track 4: African..
— TROUBLE MAKERS!!! (@PeacefulTrouble) August 5,
2015
african queen was released when there was no twitter
or instagram……….. ojuelagba is just fortunate to be in
this era….. — KING!!! (@cashigho) August 5, 2015
some peeps be comparing #ojuelegba to African queen,
u can’t even compare it to #Aye by @iamdavido to start
with.
— Abiola Solaja (@solarville2) August 5, 2015
Just because Alicia keys was dancing to ojuelegba
doesn’t mean you can start comparing it to African
queen don’t be foolish — Chalé Dangote (@Ola__YBNL)
August 5, 2015
Weed U smoked b4 comparing Ojuelebga to African
Queen is more than what this woman took. African
Queen is Legendary pic.twitter.com/jI0QkFjaoE
— Gomagallah (@DGHerbert) August 5, 2015
Everybody talking African queen, forgetting that Korede
Bello sang African Princess — TROUBLE MAKERS!!!
(@PeacefulTrouble) August 5, 2015
2face was paid $200K for African Queen to be used as
a soundtrack on Phat Girlz. Oliver Twist was no. 2 on
the UK R&B Charts & #1 in Romania
— Isima Odeh (@IsimaOdeh) August 5, 2015
People are comparing @TufaceIdibia‘s “#AfricanQueen”
to @wizkidayo‘s “#Ojuelegba.” RT=African Queen
LIKE=Ojuelegba pic.twitter.com/IUoFw27axy — Sahara
Reporters (@SaharaReporters) August 5, 2015
People are comparing @TufaceIdibia‘s “#AfricanQueen”
to @wizkidayo‘s “#Ojuelegba.” RT=African Queen
LIKE=Ojuelegba pic.twitter.com/IUoFw27axy
— Sahara Reporters (@SaharaReporters) August 5, 2015
People are comparing @TufaceIdibia‘s “#AfricanQueen”
to @wizkidayo‘s “#Ojuelegba.” RT=African Queen
LIKE=Ojuelegba pic.twitter.com/IUoFw27axy — Sahara
Reporters (@SaharaReporters) August 5, 2015
People are comparing @TufaceIdibia‘s “#AfricanQueen”
to @wizkidayo‘s “#Ojuelegba.” RT=African Queen
LIKE=Ojuelegba pic.twitter.com/IUoFw27axy
— Sahara Reporters (@SaharaReporters) August 5, 2015
“@jackdre02: I’m not that much of a 2face fan. But let’s
speak the truth.2face’s African queen song alone has
more recognition than Wizkid. — #DodoNation
(@abmillz) August 5, 2015
“@Iam_Jaymez: @jackdre02 , But african queen doesn’t
have more recognition than Ojuelgeba” pic.twitter.com/
hfJLjJKWx9
— R@ttlesnake (@Lycquid) August 5, 2015